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Study finds that more wine and cheese may be the answer to combating Alzheimer’s disease

December 15th, 2020

For a lot of people, a cheese and wine dinner is truly a culinary spectacle. Some pairings are just so absolutely brilliant and perfect. Pinot Noir and Gruyere, Sauvignon Blanc and Goat Cheese, or perhaps some Champagne and Brie?

There are dozens of cheese and wine pairings that are so delicious and bring a lot of people sheer delight.

If you’re one of those people who can enjoy a cheese platter with some wine from time to time, scientists might have good news for you.

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According to findings from researchers, consuming cheese and wine on a regular basis has a positive impact on your cognitive health, and helps to fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

The findings were made public in the scientific Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and were lead by a team of researchers at Iowa State University.

The study is also a first in many ways, and it’s the very first report on a large-scale that focuses on food consumption that can help fight the symptoms and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

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Of course, a study is only as good as its test group.

The researchers consulted the test results of 1,800 adults aged 46 – 77, all residing in the United Kingdom. This study was also a long-term one – all of the participants had to complete something called a Fluid Intelligence test when the research first started between 2006 and 2010, and also had to undergo two follow-up questionnaires after two and four years.

Thanks to these test results, scientists can find accurate long-term correlations and effects as the participants aged.

The participants were asked to go over their food and alcohol consumption habits, and the researchers were able to throw their statistics models on it to find relevant foods and drinks that have a positive effect on cognitive brain function.

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The study was published in a specific journal for Alzheimer’s disease, and the goal was to find foods and drinks that have positive effects for people with the illness.

“The right food choices can prevent Alzheimer’s and cognitive decline altogether,” the paper reads. “Depending on the genetic factors you carry, some individuals seem to be more protected from the effects of Alzheimer’s, while other seem to be at greater risk. That said, I believe the right food choices can prevent the disease and cognitive decline altogether. Perhaps the silver bullet we’re looking for is upgrading how we eat. Knowing what that entails contributes to a better understanding of Alzheimer’s and putting this disease in a reverse trajectory,” neuroscience Ph.D. candidate Brandon Klinedinst added.

It turns out that cheese and wine has a significant impact on the prevention of cognitive decline as people age.

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Cheese is by far the most important food item in the long list of dietary choices, as consuming it on a regular basis provides the most protection against Alzheimer-like symptoms.

The health benefits of cheese increase when alcohol is consumed and are strongest with red wine, in particular.

“I was pleasantly surprised that our results suggest that responsibly eating cheese and drinking red wine daily are not just good for helping us cope with our current COVID-19 pandemic, but perhaps also dealing with an increasingly complex world that never seems to slow down,” principal investigator Auriel Willette said in a statement from the University. “While we took into account whether this was just due to what well-off people eat and drink, randomized clinical trials are needed to determine if making easy changes in our diet could help our brains in significant ways.”

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If you’re interested, you can check out the entire study report, findings, and test results in the academic Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

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Source: Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, StudyFinds

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