Wellness
Wild food forager sheds light on the little known benefits of stinging nettle
People have long hated this prickly plant but if they knew how powerful it is they'd be singing a different tune.
Cherie Gozon
08.16.21

Are you one of those who frown upon the sight of Stinging Nettles?

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
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YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) is a native plant in most States. However, people don’t like to come near them because it is itchy, and it causes some allergic reactions to most people. That’s why they trim or cut it off.

YouTube Vlogger Adam Haritan from Learn Your Land will make you think twice.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
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YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

In this video, he highlighted the health benefits of Stinging Nettle. He also addressed people’s concerns of why they turn away from this plant – it stings.

People have used this plant for its medicine for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
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YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

You probably know of people who make nettle tea or have heard of nettle creams. And it just fits that they do because you’ll be surprised at how this plant is so nutritious and powerful.

Stinging Nettle is packed with vitamins and minerals.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
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YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

It is rich in Vitamins A, C, K, and B complex. It is one of the best sources of Vitamin C when you forage in the wild.

Imagine this: it contains 238 milligrams of Vitamin C per 100 grams of the Stinging Nettle tissue. That’s over 4 times the amount you’d find in your standard, medium-sized orange.

It also contains minerals our bodies need.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
Source:
YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

Adam mentioned that it is said to contain 40% protein, and that is considered very high. It also contains iron, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. For a plant that people regard as a nuisance, Stinging Nettle does pack a punch.

Studies also show that Stinging Nettles have a medical use.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
Source:
YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

This plant is said to have compounds that can reduce inflammation. Researchers also found antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-ulcer, and pain-relieving properties in Stinging Nettle. People use this plant to make creams, teas, and supplements to help relieve or cure ailments.

So, how can you take advantage of using Stinging Nettle when it stings?

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
Source:
YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

According to Adam, the key to not be stung by these green wonders is to harvest them during the best possible time- late winter to early spring.

He said that when the plants are still young, the trichomes around them are still young and won’t sting yet.

But this doesn’t mean you can’t use Stinging Nettle when they mature.

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
Source:
YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

You still can, although you must be careful because they are ready to sting you when they’re much taller. You can either use gloves and scissors to harvest them or harvest the tender tops.

He added that Nettle leaves are great for tea, so you can use those growing during summer.

After knowing all that, what do you think about the Stinging Nettle?

YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land
Source:
YouTube Screenshot|Learn Your Land

We bet you’re already viewing this plant in a different light. Sure, it can sting; but just consider all the health benefits you’re getting.

The innumerable benefits are something we badly need these days. We can all agree that this is indeed a valuable plant to have around. All thanks to Adam and Learn Your Land for this enlightening content.

Learn more about the amazing benefits of this plant and how to identify it in the video below!

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By Cherie Gozon
hi@sbly.com
Cherie Gozon is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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